Total Hip Replacement – Precautions


Total Hip Replacement(T.H.R) is a surgical procedure of removing the diseased hip joint and replacing it with an artificial one.

Usually the patients considered for T.H.R are

  1. Young patient
  2. Osteoarthritis of hip joint
  3. Rheumatoid Arthritis
  4. Avascular Necrosis
  5. Septicemia

There is a progressive increase in chronic pain and difficulty in walking, stair climbing and rising froma chair.

Usually there are two types of prosthesis which are commonly used for the surgery: Cemented and Uncemented Prosthesis.

Difference of cemented and uncemented prosthesis:

Cemented prosthesis is usually used in older patients who are less active and have less bone moneral density.

Uncemented Prosthesis is used in younger and more active individuals.

The primary disadvantage of uncemented rposthesis is the extended recovery periof. Because it takes long time for natural bone to grow and attach to prosthesis, hence the person has to limit his activitties for upto 3 months to protect hip.

Your hospital stay my last for a week. If you go home you will need help for several weeks.

The following steps can make your home coming easier:

  • In kitchen as well as other rooms, place items of daily use within reach so you dont have to reach up or bend down.
  • Rearrange furniture you can walk easily with walker or stick.
  • Get a good chair that is firm and higher than average seat.
  • Remove rugs or area rugs that could make you slip.
  • Securely fasten electrical cords around perimeter of the room
  • Install a shower chair grab bar and raised toilet.
  • Use assistive devices such as long handle sponge and grabbing tool or reacher to avoid bending too far.

Once you get home, stay active.The key is not to overdo it while you expect some good and some bad days, you should notice gradual improvement over time.

WEIGHT BEARINGDiscuss with your physical therapist regarding the weight bearing of operated leg as the rehabilitation protocol will be different for cemented and uncemented prosthesis.

STANDING: Move your operated leg first and pushoff the armrest of chair to stand up.

SLEEPING POSITIONS: Sleep on your back with legs slightly apart on your side with abduction pillow.Be sure to use the pillow atleast 6 weeks or untill your doctor tells you to use. Sleeping on stomach is alright.

SITTING: For atleast 3 months donot cross your legs at knees. Make sure the seat height is good so as to avoid bending of hip beyond 90 degreesGet up and move around possibly every 1 hour.

SEX: Some sex positions can be safely resumed 4-6 weeks after surgery. Ask your doctor regarding the same.

CLIMBING: Stair climbing should be limited if possible untill the wound is healed.

Following pattern of stair climbing should be followed.

GOING UP :

  • the unaffected leg should step up first
  • then bring affected leg to same step
  • then bring the cane

GOING DOWN:

  •  put the cane first
  • next bring the affected leg down the step
  • finally step down with unaffected leg.

DRIVING: You can begin driving an automatic car 4 to 8 weeks after consulting your doctor and symptoms after surgery.

SITTING INTO CAR: Be sure the passenger seat is pushed all the back.Recline the seat as far as possible.with the walker in front of you slowly back up the car seat.Swing your legs into the car.Lean back if you need to avoid the hip more than 90 degrees.

GETTING OUT OF THE CAR: Push the seat all the way back.recline the seat and lift your legs out.lean back if you need to.place walker up in front of you and stand up on unaffected leg.

RETURN TO WORK: Depending on the type of activities you eprform it may take as long as 3 months to 6 months to return to work.

OTHER ACTIVITIES: Walk as much as you like once doctor gives you permission, but remember donot substitute walking to exercise.Swimming is recommended once suture are removed and wound is healed.Acceptable activities are dancing, golfing with spike less shoes and cart,bicycling on level road.Avoid activities that involve impact or stress on joints such as tennis, badminton or contact sports like baseball, football,squash, jumping or jogging, Lifting weights is not a problem but carrying heavy and awkward objects that cause to stagger is not advised especially if you must go up and down stairs or slopes.

Do’s and Dont’s

The do’s and dont’s vary depending on orthopaedic surgeons apporach.Your doctor and Physical therapist will provide you with a list of the same to remember with your new hip.The precautions will help you to prevent the new joint from dislocation and ensure proper healing.

 The Dont’s

  • Donot cross legs at knee for atleast 8 weeks
  • donot bring knee up higher han your hip
  • donot lean forward while sitting or as you sit down
  • donot try to pick up something on the floor while ou are sitting
  • donot turn your feet excessively inwards or outwards
  • donot reach down to pull your blanket when lying down
  • donot bend at waist beyond 90 degrees
  • donot use pain as a only guide for what you may or may not do

The Do’s

  • Keep skin dry and clean
  • Notify doctor if wound drains
  • Swelling is normal for first 3-6 months. Elevate leg slightly <30 degrees on pillow and put ice packs for 15-20 min
  • If you get calf pain , chest pain and shortness of breath notify doctor immediately
  • Do exercises prescribed daily.
  • A balanced diet is very important.
  • Maintain an active lifestyle after surgery.

DISCLAIMER: Kindly refer your doctor and Physical therapist for the instructions depending on your surgery procedure.

Physiotherapy to Treat Pelvic Organ Prolapse (Guest Post by DrugWatch.com)


Women diagnosed with Pelvic Organ Prolapse (POP) may feel confused about what the diagnosis means, and what treatments are available. It is important that women become educated on the subject since approximately 50 percent will be diagnosed with it. POP occurs when a weakened pelvic floor allows pelvic organs to fall, or drop, placing pressure on the vagina.

The good news is that many cases of POP, especially cases with very mild to moderate symptoms, can be treated using physiotherapy — physical therapy — rather than surgery. Some surgical procedures, especially those using transvaginal mesh, have been linked to serious and irreversible health complications. Physiotherapy can often reverse the symptoms of POP, allowing women to skip risky surgical treatment altogether.

Can Pelvic Organ Prolapse be Avoided?

One of the most natural ways to avoid POP is to do physiotherapy-based exercises before POP sets in. POP is usually diagnosed in women between the ages of 50 and 79 because menopause is a time when estrogen levels decrease and pelvic tissues become thin and weak.

Pregnancy and childbirth are leading causes of POP. Additional factors include smoking and obesity. Women can be proactive about their pelvic health by leading a healthy lifestyle and doing daily exercises, such as Kegels, to keep pelvic muscles healthy and strong.

Physiotherapy Options for Treating Pelvic Organ Prolapse

Once POP has been diagnosed, there are several safe and effective methods for treating it. Women will want to discuss these options with their doctor before agreeing to surgery.

Pelvic Floor Exercises: Pelvic floor exercises like Kegels, Yoga and Pilates can help to strengthen the pelvic floor and core muscles. This can often reverse mild symptoms and protect organs from prolapsing further.

Pelvic Physiotherapy: There are physical therapists who specialize in pelvic health. A doctor can recommend a pelvic physical therapist who will instruct and guide women through a series of exercises that focus on pelvic muscles to reverse the symptoms of POP. Women with a family history of POP may want to start these exercises when they are young to help prevent POP.

Electrical Stimulation: Doctors can use electrical stimulation to manually strengthen pelvic floor muscles, if Kegel exercises aren’t enough. They also have biofeedback machines that can demonstrate whether a woman is doing pelvic exercises effectively. If the feedback indicates the muscles aren’t being stimulated, a doctor can work to instruct the patient on how to do the exercises more effectively.

Not only is pelvic physiotherapy beneficial for women with POP, it can also help women who experience incontinence. In fact, research demonstrates that women who perform proper Kegel exercises on a daily basis during pregnancy are much less likely to develop incontinence during their third trimester. Continued use of these exercises can prevent incontinence altogether.

Other Non-Invasive Treatments

The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists has recommended that women with mild to moderate POP opt for more conservative treatments, as opposed to surgical treatments. The organization has also stressed the importance of taking preventative actions against the development of POP.

   Healthy Lifestyle: POP can be prevented. Many of the symptoms of POP are worsened by unhealthy lifestyles, such as smoking and chronic straining, such as with constipation, and obesity. By maintaining a healthy and active lifestyle and weight, the risk of POP can be minimized.

   Vaginal pessary: A pessary is a removable device placed into the vagina, designed to support prolapsed organs. Pessaries hold organs in the correct place before it becomes enlarged and protrudes through the vagina. The pessary is fitted as to not cause discomfort. Symptoms of POP usually improve or go away after pessary use. Risks include wearing of vaginal wall and bleeding; but can be prevented by insuring the device fits correctly.

Working with doctors, and implementing physiotherapy when necessary, can prevent the development of POP and can often reverse existing symptoms of the condition. Transvaginal mesh, a common surgical device used to treat POP, has been determined risky by the Food and Drug Administration.  Thousands of women who are suffering from its use have filed vaginal mesh lawsuits against the manufacturers. Now, it is more important than ever that women do all they can to prevent the need for risky surgical procedures.

For further updates on this condition and its treatments, stay tuned to Fitnesspedia.

Senior Fitness Test- Functional Fitness Testing


The Senior Fitness Test was developed at Fullerton University, by Dr. Roberta Rikli and Dr. Jessie Jones. As such, the test is sometimes known as the Fullerton Functional Test. It is a simple, easy-to-use battery of test items that assess the functional fitness of older adults. The test describes easy to understand and effective tests to measure aerobic fitness, strength and flexibility using minimal & inexpensive equipment.

The individual fitness test items involve common activities such as getting up from a chair, walking, lifting, bending, & stretching. The tests were developed to be safe & enjoyable for older adults, while still meeting scientific standards for reliability & validity.

List of Equipment Required

The following is a complete list of the equipment you will need to complete the Functional Fitness Test:

  • A Chair Without Arms – preferably a folding chair for greater stability
  • A Stopwatch or Watch with a second hand
  • 5 Pound Weight for women
  • 8 Pound Weight for men
  • Piece of String or Cord about 30” in length
  • Visible, bright color duct tape
  • Counter – to track number of repetitions completed or paper and pencil to track manually
  • Ruler that goes up to 12”
  • Measuring Tape
  • Small Orange Cone

 Functional Fitness Tests

CHAIR STAND TEST — Testing Lower Body Strength

Daily Benefit: Lower body strengthis important for activities such as getting out of a chair, on the bus, out of the car, & rising up from a kneeling position in the house or garden. The strength of your lower body can directly affect the ease with which you perform the activities you do every day.

Equipment:Chair without arms, Stopwatch

Test Steps:

  • Place the chair against a wall where it will be stable.
  • Sit in the middle of the chair with your feet flat on the floor, shoulder width apart, back straight.
  • Cross your arms at the wrist and place them against your chest.
  • The test partner will tell you when to begin and will time you for 30 seconds, using the stopwatch. You will rise up to a full stand and sit again as many times as you can during the 30‐second interval.
  • Each time you stand during the test be sure you come to a full stand.
  • When you sit, make sure you sit all the way down. Do not just touch your backside to the chair. You must fully sit between each stand.
  • Do not push off your thighs, or off the seat of the chair with your hands to help you stand unless you have to.
  • Keep your arms against your chest crossed and do not allow the arms to swing up as you rise.
  • If you are on your way up to stand when time is called you will be given credit for that stand.

Risk Zone: Less than 8 unassisted stands for men & women.

ARM CURL TEST — Testing Upper Body Strength

Daily Benefit:Upper body strength is important for activities such as carrying laundry, groceries, & luggage. It is also important for picking up grandchildren & giving them a big hug! A lack of upper body strength could keep you from pouring milk from a jug, being able to go grocery shopping for yourself & maintaining your independence.

Equipment: 5 lb Weight & an 8 lb weight, stopwatch & a straight‐back chair with no arms.

Women will curl a 5 lb. weight in this test and Men will curl an 8 lb. weight for their test. It is extremely important to the accuracy of the test that you use the appropriate weight for men & women in this test.

Test Steps:

  • Your test partner will tell you when to begin and will time you for 30 seconds, using the stopwatch or a watch with a second hand.
  • Do as many curls as you can in the allotted 30‐second time period, moving in a controlled manner.
  • Remember to do a Full Curl, squeezing your lower arm against your upper arm at the top of each curl and returning to a straight arm each time. Keep your upper arm still.
  • DO NOT SWING THE WEIGHT.
  • If you have started raising the weight again and are over halfway up when time is called, you may count that curl!

Risk Zone: Less than 11 curls in correct form for men & women.

CHAIR SIT AND REACH TEST — Lower Body Flexibility Test

Daily Benefit:Lower body flexibility is important for preventing lower back pain. It also plays a role in your balance, posture, in fall prevention, and in your gait, or walking. Lower body flexibility is important for maintaining an active, independent lifestyle.

Equipment:Chair, Ruler

Test Steps:

  • Place the chair against a wall so it will be stable.
  • Slide forward in your chair until you are able to straighten one of your legs. The ankle of your straight leg should be flexed at about a 90‐degree angle. Your other foot should be flat on the floor.
  • Place one of your hands directly on top of the other so that they are stacked with your fingers extended.
  • Exhale as you bend forward at the hip and try to reach your toes. If the extended leg begins to bend, move back in your chair until the leg is straight.
  • Hold the stretch for at least 2 seconds and Do Not Bounce or jerk as you reach.
  • Take two practice reaches on each leg. Determine which side is more flexible.
  • You will measure and record only your most flexible side on your scorecard.
  • Be sure you have a stable chair so that the chair will not tip forward as you reach for your toes.
  • After you have completed the practice reaches, your test partner will hold a ruler across the toe of your shoe. The center of the toe of your shoe is considered to be a measurement of “0”.
  • Reach forward toward your toes. Mark your score to the nearest half‐inch
  • If you reach past this “0” point at the middle of your toe, you receive a positive score of as many inches as you reach past it, measured to the nearest half‐inch.
  • If you cannot reach your toes, you receive a negative score of as many inches as you are short of the “0” point at the middle of the toe of your shoe, measured to the nearest half‐inch.
  • Try the reach twice and record the better of the two measurements.

Risk Zone: Men: Minus (-) 4” or more; Women: Minus (-) 2” or more.

BACK SCRATCH TEST — Upper Body Flexibility Test

Daily Benefit: Upper body flexibility affects your ability to reach for items that may be high on a shelf, change a light bulb, or do any activity that requires arm and/or shoulder movement.

Maintaining flexibility in your upper body will assist you in continuing to live independently.

Equipment: Ruler

Test Steps:

  • Place your left arm straight up in the air above your left shoulder.
  • Bend your left arm at the elbow to reach toward your back, with your fingers extended. Your elbow pointed toward the ceiling.
  • Place your right hand behind your back with your palm out and your fingers extended up.
  • Reach up as far as possible and attempt to touch the fingers of your two hands together. Some people are not able to touch at all, while others’ fingers may overlap.
  • Take two practice stretches with each arm, determining which side is more flexible.
  • You will be measuring and recording only your most flexible side.
  • You are now ready to be measured. Perform the stretch as outlined above. Without shifting your hands, your test partner will position your fingers so that they are pointing toward each other.
  • The distance between the fingertips of one hand and the other is measured to the nearest half inch. If your fingers overlap, the amount of the overlap will be measured.
  • Fingertips just touching receive a score of “0”.
  • If your fingers do not touch, you receive a negative score of the distance between your fingers, measured to the nearest .5 or half inch.
  • You receive a positive score if your fingers overlap, measuring the overlap to the nearest .5 or half inch.
  • If you are able to touch your fingers together, do not grab your fingers together and pull, as this will affect the accuracy of your score.
  • Do the stretch twice, recording the best score and remember to indicate if the score was positive or negative.

Risk Zone: Men: Minus (-) 4” or more; Women: Minus (-) 2” or more.

8-FOOT UP AND GO TEST — Speed, Agility & Balance Test

Daily Benefit: Important for activities such as walking through crowds, moving in unfamiliar environments & across changing terrain, & crossing the street before the light changes. The better your balance is, the more confident you will be traveling outside your home & living an active life. Your speed & balance directly affect your self‐assurance as you go about your daily activities.

Equipment:Chair, Cone (or other marker), Stopwatch

Test Steps:

  • Sit in the chair with your hands on your thighs, your feet flat on the floor with one foot slightly ahead of the other.
  • Your test partner will hold the stopwatch and stand near the place where you will walk around the marker on the floor.
  • Your test partner will signal, “go” and start the watch. For test accuracy, your test partner must start the watch on the signal, “go.” Do not wait to start the watch after the participant has started to move.
  • The test is timed to the nearest tenth (.1) of a second, so it is important to be as accurate as possible when starting and stopping the watch.
  • Upon the signal “go” rise from the chair and walk as quickly as possible out to the marker. You may press off your thighs of the chair when you rise. Do not run. Walk around the outside of the marker and return to your seat as quickly as possible, being sure to be safe in your movements.
  • As soon as you are fully seated again your test partner will stop the watch and record your time to the nearest tenth of a second.
  • If you would like to take a practice test before testing for a score you may. You may then take the test twice, recording your best score.
  • Remember to record the score to the nearest tenth, for example 4.9 seconds or 8.9 seconds.

Risk Zone: More than 9 seconds.

WALK TEST (6 MINUTES) & STEP IN PLACE TEST (2 MINUTES)* — Physical Stamina/Endurance Test

Daily Benefit:Endurance is important for activities such as shopping, walking for a distance, and traveling. The more physical stamina you have, the more energy you will have to do the things you enjoy. You will also be able to do more with less fatigue. Your endurance affects your ability to perform many of your daily activities and to maintain your independence.

Equipment:Stop Watch, Measuring Tape, Visible Tape (i.e. masking tape or painter’s tape)

Set Up:

Begin by setting the minimum knee or stepping height for each participant. This is at the level even with the midway point between the kneecap and the front hipbone (Iliac crest). It can be determined using a tape measure or by stretching a cord from the middle of the kneecap (patella) to the hipbone. Then you can fold it over and mark this point on the thigh with a piece of tape.

Test Steps:

  • Your test partner will tell you when to begin and will time you for two full minutes using the stopwatch.
  • Begin stepping, being careful to lift your knees to the appropriate height each time so that your knee is level with the tape mark on the wall. Your entire foot must touch the ground on each step to ensure that you are not jogging, you need to “step”.
  • Your test partner will count each time you raise your right knee, counting each full stepping cycle. A full step cycle is when both the right and the left foot have lifted off the floor and come back down.
  • Your test partner should alert you at each 30 second interval to allow you to gauge how you feel. If you cannot complete the full 2 minutes that is fine, just complete as much time as you can comfortably complete.
  • If you wish to rest during the test you may stop stepping, rest and then resume the test. The stopwatch will continue to run and you may start stepping again as long as you are still within the two‐minute test period.

Risk Zone: Walk Test: Less than 350 yards for men & women; Step Test: Less than 65 steps for men & women.

*The Walk Test is used to assess aerobic fitness unless the person uses orthopaedic devices when walking or has difficulty balancing, in which case they do the Step in Place Test

Fitness is very important for those in their senior years. Older adults need to have adequate strength, flexibility, and endurance to accomplish everyday tasks. Assessing these components of fitness can detect weaknesses which can be treated before causing serious functional limitations.

Trigger Finger


Trigger Finger/Stenosing Tenosynovitis/Flexor Tendinitis is a type of tendinitis which develops in the tendons which bend the fingers. Your fingers or your thumb gets stuck in a bent position and then straightens with a snap — like a trigger being pulled and released.

It is a common problem because of the way that the hand is made. There are no muscles in the fingers themselves. We actually move our fingers by remote control. Muscles in the forearm are connected to the finger bones by smooth, flexible strings, called tendons. The muscles pull on the tendons, which then bend the finger joints.

Trigger finger generally results from swelling within a tendon sheath, restricting tendon motion. A bump (nodule) also may form.

Causes:

  • Highly repetitive or forceful use of the finger and thumb
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Gout
  • Diabetes
  • Hypothyroidism
  • Amyloidosis
  • Certain infections, like Tuberculosis

Farmers, industrial workers, and musicians are frequently affected by trigger finger. Even smokers can get trigger thumb from repetitive use of a lighter. Trigger finger is more common in women than men and tends to occur most frequently in people who are between 40 and 60 years of age.

Symptoms:

  • Soreness at the base of the finger or thumb
  • Finger stiffness, particularly in the morning
  • A popping or clicking sensation when attempting to flex or extend the affected finger
  • Tenderness or a bump (nodule) at the base of the affected finger
  • Finger catching or locking in a bent position, which suddenly pops straight
  • Finger locked in a bent position, which you are unable to straighten

Trigger fingers may result in tenderness and swelling in the palm (red areas), and stiffness, pain and clicking in the finger joints (blue areas).

Trigger finger more commonly occurs in your dominant hand, and most often affects your thumb or your middle or ring finger. More than one finger may be affected at a time, and both hands might be involved. Triggering is usually more pronounced in the morning, while firmly grasping an object or when straightening your finger. This catching sensation tends to worsen after periods of inactivity and loosen up with movement.

In some cases, the finger or thumb that is affected locks in a flexed position or in an extended position as the condition becomes more severe, and must be gently straightened with the other hand. Joint contraction or stiffening may eventually occur.

Treatment:

  • ConservativeNSAIDs, Physical Therapy, Splinting, Steroid Injections
  • SurgicalTendon Sheath Release

If trigger finger is severe, your finger may become locked in a bent position.

The time it takes to recover from trigger finger depends on the severity of the condition, which varies from person to person. The choice of treatment also impacts recovery time. For example, splinting may be necessary for six weeks. However, most patients with trigger finger recover within a few weeks by resting and limiting the use of the affected finger and/or using anti-inflammatory drugs.

Note: Trigger finger is not the same as Dupuytren’s contracture — a condition that causes thickening and shortening of the connective tissue in the palm of the hand — though it may occur in conjunction with this disorder.

Total Hip Replacement


Total Hip replacement is a surgical procedure of removing the diseased the femur head and neck and replacing it with an artificial prosthesis.

Usually the patients considered for the total hip replacements are:

  • Young patient
  • Osteoarthritis of hip joint
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Avascular necrosis
  • Septicemia
There is a progressive increase in chronic pain and difficulty in walking, stair climbing & even rising from a chair.
Difference in Cemented & Uncemented prosthesis:
Cemented prosthesis is usually used in older patients who are less active  and have less bone density.
Whereas uncemented can be used in younger andactive individuals.

The primary disadvantage of uncemented prosthesis is the extended recovery period.
Because it takes a long time for the natural bone to grow and attach to prosthesis, hence the person has to limit his activitites for upto 3 months to protect hip.

Your hospital stay may last for a week, if you go straight home you will need help for several weeks. The following steps can make you homecoming easier:

  1. In kitchen as well as other rooms, place items you use frequently within reach so you dont have to reach up or bend down.
  2. Rearrange furniture so you can walk easuily with walker or stick.
  3. Get a good chair: the one that is firm and higher than average sear
  4. Remove any throw rugs or area rugs that could make u slip.
  5. Securely fasten electrical cords around perimeter of the room.
  6. Install a shower chair, grab bar and raised toilet.
  7. Use assistive devices such as long andle sponge and a grabbing tool or reacher to avoid bending too far.
  8. Wear big pocket shirts or soft shoulder bag for carrying things.

Activities at Home:

  • Keep skin dry and clean,
  • Notify doctor if your wound drains.
  • Swelling is normal for first 3-6 months. elevate leg slightly <30 degrees on pillow and put ice pack for 15 20 min.
  • If u have calf pain, chest pain and shortness of breath notify immediately.

Resuming Activities at Home:
Once you get home, stay active. The KEY is not to overdo it, while you expect some good days and some bad days, you should notice gradual improvement over time.

Weight Bearing
Discuss with you physical therapist regarding the weight bearing of the operated leg as the rehabilitation protocol will be different for cemented and uncemented.

Driving
You can begin driving an automatic car in 4 to 8 weeks after consulting your doctor and your symptoms post surgery.

Sex
Some form of sex positions can be safely resumed 4-6 weeks after surgery. Ask you doctor regarding the same.

Sleeping positions

  • Sleep on you back with legs slightly apart on your side with abduction pillow.
  • Be sure to use pillow atleast 6 weeks ot untill doctor says not to use,Sleeping on stomach is alright,
Sitting
  • For atleast 3 months sit only on chairs that have arms.
  • Do not sit on low chair, reclining chairs.Donot cross your legs at knees.
  • Get up and move around possibly every 1 hour.

Climbing

  • Stair climbing should be limited if possible untill healing is far enough.
  • If you must go up stairs- The unaffected leg should step up first, then bring affected leg up to same step, then bring your cane.
  • To go down- Put cane first, next bring affected leg down to that step, finally step down with unaffected leg

Return to work:
Depending on the type of activiies you perform it may take as long as 3 months or 6 months to return to work.

Other activities:

  • Walk as much as you like once doctor given you go ahead, but remember don’t substitute walking for your prescribed exercise.
  • Swimming is recommended once sutures are removed and wound is healed, apporox 6-8 weeks after surgery,
  • Acceptable activities are dancing, golfing with spikeless shoes and cart , bicycling on level surfaces.
  • Avoid activites that involve impact or stress on joints such as tennis, badminton, contact sports such as baseball, football, squash, jumping or jogging
  • Lifting weight is not problem but carrying heavy awkward object thatr cause you to stagger is not advised esp if you must go up or down stairs or slopes

DOS AND DONTS:
The dos and donts vary depending on orthopaedic surgeon’s approach.
Your doctor and physical therapist will provide you with a list of do’s and dont’s to remember with your new hip.
The precautions will help you to prevent the new joint from dislocation and ensure proper healing.

  • Do not cross your legg at the knees for atleast 8 weeks
  • Do not bring your knee up higher than your hip
  • Do not lean forward while sitting or as you sit down
  • Do not try to pick something onfloor while you are sitting
  • Do not turn your feet excessively inward or outward when you bend down
  • Do not reach down to pull your blankets when lying in bed
  • Do not bend at waist beyond 90 degree
  • Do not stand pigeon toed
  • Do not kneel on knees on un operated leg
  • Do not use pain as a guide for what you may or may not do.
DO cut back on your exercise if your muscle aches but dont stop doing exercise.

Pilates for Senior Citizens- Why?


Good Posture: head over shoulders, over hips, over knees, over ankles.

Pilates for senior citizens works wonders as it is low impact compared to other forms of exercise. It’s not as severe on the joints as other types of exercise workouts.

Pilates focusses on breathing & quality-controlled movements, not repetitions.
How Pilates Works?
“Pilates stretches muscles that are tight & strengthens those that are weak to help realign your body to its natural form.”
  • Pilates develops the body uniformly, corrects wrong postures, restores physical vitality, invigorates the mind & elevates the spirit.
  • Pilates is unique. It systematically exercises all the muscle groups in the body, the weak as well as the strong.
  • The exercises make you stronger, flexible, & less likely to fall because they re-educate your body to use all of your muscles, not just the superficial ones.
  • By strengthening both your large muscles & the deep, smaller endurance muscles that are responsible for your strength, they take the strain off the larger muscles & give them added support.
  • Concentration & correct breathing are added to exercise for the older adult that can teach you to recruit the smaller, supportive muscles.

With Pilates exercise for senior citizens the center of your body needs to be your focus (core).

This is the place from which all movement begins & proceeds to the extremities- the whole body working together.

Every movement and exercise for seniors, especially walking, should be started by first contracting the core of the body.

Bottom line: less pain, greater range of motion, and fewer falls.

DISCLAIMER: Always talk to your health care provider before starting an exercise program.